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Mazara del Vallo

Mazara del Vallo

Views of Mazara del Vallo

Mazara del Vallo

Mazara del Vallo

Mazara del Vallo

Mazara del Vallo

The large village of Mazara del Vallo is overlooking the Mediterranean Sea, in Sicily. The site at the mouth of the river Màzaro, is less than 200 km from the Tunisian coast of North Africa. The old town center, a time enclosed within the walls Norman, includes numerous monumental churches, some dating back to the XI century. Presents the characteristic traits of the districts to urbanistic plant typical Islamic of the medinas, called Casbah (also Kasbah), of which the narrow alleys are a species of trademark.

The first human settlements in the territory mazarese date back to the early Palaeolithic, at Roccazzo's, where have been found traces of scatchers, Engravers, blades of flint and other handicraft products. Subsequent settlements, dating back to the Mesolithic period, were found at the Gorghi Tondi. You have testimonies of human settlements also during the neolithic period, with the tombs to caves, there and during the Eneolithic, with several settlements capannicoli and necropolis. During the Bronze Age settlements were concentrated along the valleys of the Mazaro and Arena, in the districts Gattolo, Granatelli and Malopasso. Around 1000 BC, the Sicilian region left monumental tombs to dromos. In the XI century b.c. you have the first contacts with the Phoenicians, who find in Mazara a ideal place to make stops during long journeys to Spain. Initially they were transient, subsequently founded a emporio, with establishments and permanent deposits, as witnessed by the vases, glasses and coins of Phoenician origin found between the mouth of the Mazaro and Cape Feto. other ruins that confirm the presence fenicia in Mazara you have in excavations in the palace of the Knights of Malta, which overlooks just a few meters from the mouth of the Mazaro. But only during the Greek period-selinuntino the city became an urban center organized, a flourishing emporium of Selinunte, a first period of great expansion of the city so that were minted its own coins with the inscription ἐμπόριον (empòrion). Destroyed Selinunte by the Carthaginians in 409 BC, Mazara went through a period of some 150 years about now under the domination of Syracuse, now under the Carthaginian, up to the conquest of the island on the part of Rome. The Punic period and romano is testified by the abundance of finds in the city: sarcophagi, urns, tombstones, mosaics, and Roman villas. It is in this period that Christianity is taking its first steps in the city, and it is in this period that is born San Vito. The most likely place of meeting early proselytes of the new religion were the caves of San Bartolomeo, in contrada Miragliano.

The raids of the Vandals and the Goths didn't save the city, who lived a period of decadence socio-economic and demographic changes. Only in 533, when Belisario, driving of the Byzantines, defeated the Vandals, the town regained a climate of calm, starting repopulated. Excessive taxation of new domination, however, hindered the then fledgling trade and local crafts. It was only with the Muslims of Ifriqiya, Arabs and especially the Berbers, landed at Capo Granitola, near Mazara on 16 June 827, that you had the economic awakening of the city that became the largest center in the legal status of Sicily and an important commercial point, artistic and literary. In 1072, with the Normans, the city saw the construction of the Cathedral, and the establishment of a new diocese. In the period from 1093 to 1097, it became the seat of the government and residence of Count Ruggero. In 1154 the geographer Idrisi lived in Mazara, and described in the book of Ruggero. After the Normans, the city experienced a new period of depression: Federico II of Swabia in 1216 decided to transfer all the Muslims present on the territory in the plain of Lucera, in Puglia, seriously damaging to the local agricultural production and craft. Even with the subsequent Angevin domination things changed. At the end of 1317, King Frederick III of Aragon with all his court stared at his home in the city. Back in Palermo, in July 1318 enacted a series of measures that few cities of the time could boast: abolished the charges of the barons on vettovaglie, granted the use of wood in the forests of Berrybaida and Castelvetrano, instituted a Franca Fair of the duration of 30 days.

The city experienced a period of Lordly dominion, under the Peralta (1392-1397), the auditors Cabrera (1418-1445), Duke of Calabria Ferdinand (1450-1479), the Regina Giovanna (1479-1518) and finally the conte Cardona (1521-1531). During this period the city had to redeem their freedom for well twice, at its own expense, returning to the Royal Property, under which knew, in the seventeenth century, years of misery, culminating in the uprisings of 1647. In the following century the city took part with enthusiasm to the movements of the indipendentistici 1820, 1848 and 1860, and during the plebiscite of 21 and 22 October 1860, the Citizens signed the national unit with only twenty electors against. There followed a period of economic depression and demographic, started with migratory flows toward the United States of America, Australia and the states of South America, and culminated with the first world war. Between 1920 and 1930, the fleet remo sail-became a fleet to mechanical propulsion, and this led to an increase of the catch. The second world war suspended, momentarily, the economic development of the city, which resumed immediately after the end of the war event.

The Immigration of Tunisia in Sicily began around the end of the sixties, after a little less than a millennium from the decisive victory on Muslims of Count Roger the Norman in the year 1073, which recaptured the island. Despite the work of transformation worked by the Normans, the town of Mazara still preserves many distinctive characteristics of the Arab culture-Berbera. The most obvious sign is the impression the islamic road of the ancient Arab city, today called "Kasbah": alleys and small streets and winding, which extend from a central axis and lead to numerous courtyards, where open access to dwellings.

The Municipality of Mazara del Vallo
Province of Trapani
Region Sicily

Inhabitants: 51.718
Altitude center: 8 m a.s.l.

The Municipality is part of:
Cities of bio
Cities of sea fish
Cities of wine
Road of Wine and Flavors Val di Mazara

Protected Natural Areas:
Reserv natural Lake Preola and Gorghi Tondi

Municipality of Mazara Del Vallo
Via Carmine - 91026 Mazara del Vallo (TP)
Tel. 0923-671413

Sgarbi proposes to bring the Dancing Satyr to Vinitaly 2018

The Councilor for Cultural Heritage wants to bring the famous statue to Verona in the pavilion that will host the Sicilian cellars from April 15th to 18th 2018

Next or present Events

  • Rite of Aurora - Easter Sunday
    21-04-2019
    Religious occurrences

    Add to calendar 2019-04-21 2019-04-21 Europe/Rome Rite of Aurora - Easter Sunday During the morning of Easter Sunday, in Piazza della Repubblica takes place the rite of the Aurora: a religious rite that celebrates the Resurrection of Jesus. In the province of Trapani is celebrated only at Mazara and in Castelvetrano, introduced by the Discalced Carmelite Fathers not before 1667, the year in which settled in the city. In some towns of Sicily and Calabria is called addressed. Just before the nine hours, a Risen Christ, wrapped in a blanket of red and with a white flag, is conducted by the church of Santa Caterina, far below the entrance of Piazza della Repubblica, under the passage that combines the Cathedral and the Palazzo Vescovile. At the same time, a Madonna dressed in white and surrounded by a black cloak, preceded by twelve other confreres of the same company, is carried out at the other end of the piazza, on via XX Settembre. For a given sign, the Christ and the Madonna, which è removed the black mantle, are brought to the center of the piazza, and a short distance from one another, bowing three times. In the meantime, the statue of the Madonna that is hollow, are freed of white doves. Then begins the procession that bring againà the statues to the respective churches: in front of the confreres, subsequently the Christ and, more behind, the Madonna. Before 1864, the year in which it was abolished this custom, in the midst of the rite by the then via Maestranza, now via Garibaldi sbucava a man, the death of Easter, dressed with a lot of yellow canvas on which was painted a skeleton in black, with in hand a sickle and a basket. This passed between the crowd, and rescued children the Campanaro, a typical local sweet, and anything they hold in your hands with the tacit consent of parents. This character also passed in the shops of foodstuffs, taking always something. This rite is even mentioned by some ways to say common in city: Sarvatìllu pi on the morning of Easter (preserve for the morning of Easter), once used to indicate a garment out of use, becauseé during the rite of the Aurora is wearing accessories that you saw only on that anniversary; Ficiru the arora (have done the Aurora), it says to two people who are not seen for some time and which run the a meeting to another. Mazara del Vallo

    During the morning of Easter Sunday, in Piazza della Repubblica takes place the rite of the Aurora: a religious rite that celebrates the Resurrection of Jesus. In the province of Trapani is celebrated only at Mazara and in Castelvetrano, introduced by the Discalced Carmelite Fathers not before 1667, the year in which settled in the city. In some towns of Sicily and Calabria is called addressed. Just before the nine hours, a Risen Christ, wrapped in a blanket of red and with a white flag, is conducted by the church of Santa Caterina, far below the entrance of Piazza della Repubblica, under the passage that combines the Cathedral and the Palazzo Vescovile. At the same time, a Madonna dressed in white and surrounded by a black cloak, preceded by twelve other confreres of the same company, is carried out at the other end of the piazza, on via XX Settembre. For a given sign, the Christ and the Madonna, which è removed the black mantle, are brought to the center of the piazza, and a short distance from one another, bowing three times. In the meantime, the statue of the Madonna that is hollow, are freed of white doves. Then begins the procession that bring againà the statues to the respective churches: in front of the confreres, subsequently the Christ and, more behind, the Madonna. Before 1864, the year in which it was abolished this custom, in the midst of the rite by the then via Maestranza, now via Garibaldi sbucava a man, the death of Easter, dressed with a lot of yellow canvas on which was painted a skeleton in black, with in hand a sickle and a basket. This passed between the crowd, and rescued children the Campanaro, a typical local sweet, and anything they hold in your hands with the tacit consent of parents. This character also passed in the shops of foodstuffs, taking always something. This rite is even mentioned by some ways to say common in city: Sarvatìllu pi on the morning of Easter (preserve for the morning of Easter), once used to indicate a garment out of use, becauseé during the rite of the Aurora is wearing accessories that you saw only on that anniversary; Ficiru the arora (have done the Aurora), it says to two people who are not seen for some time and which run the a meeting to another.

  • The Feast of San Vito (second half of August)
    From 15-08-2019
    To 31-08-2019
    Patronal parties

    Add to calendar 2019-08-15 2019-08-31 Europe/Rome The Feast of San Vito (second half of August) A silver statue of the Saint is carried in procession during u fistinu, with sailors in traditional costume. Tradition is strongly felt by mazaresi is u fistinu of Santu Vitu, (the feast of San Vito), a celebration in honor of the patron saint of the city. These celebrations have their origin in the XVII century, when, on 23 August 1614, the jurors will decide to add to the Most Holy Savior, already the patron saint of the city, the fellow San Vito as patron. This decision was then approved on 8 September of the same year by the then bishop, Monsignor Marco La Cava. The celebrations, initially held within four days prior to 15 June, were subsequently moved between the penultimate and the last week of August. Traditionally the feast opens with the proclamation, a procession in seventeenth-century dresses that winds through the streets of the city, and carries out the stops to allow the herald of proclaiming the announcement. In the days following the announcement is the Historic Procession-ideal living pictures illustrating the story of San Vito and its modest educators and Crescenzia (Sts. Opens the procession on the figure of the ancient coat of arms of the city: a woman, with in hand a cup, in the act of feeding a snake (nutrit alios et spernit suos). Follow three allegorical floats which represent the virtuesù who, according to tradition, are attributed to the holy: faith, hope and strength. These were followed by the living pictures that evoke the life of the holy: The first represents the family of Vito, with the Father lla and Vito itself, surrounded by the servants and handmaids; The second represents the imperial court Roman Diocletian and daughter Valeria healed by the holy, that parade between the senators and the Roman governor Valeriano; The third represents the communityà Christian; in Rome with the pope Marcellinus surrounded by seven deacons. The fourth represents Vito to the età of martyrdom between modest and Crescenzia (Sts, and behind them the handmaids bearing palms, sign of martyrdom, the angels and the executioner. Closes the procession the carriage with the silver statue of the Saint, towed by mazaresi fishermen in traditional costume. The festivities will conclude with the shipment of the statue on a vessel, the Blessing of the sea and the launch of a laurel wreath in water, in memory of the sailors mazaresi died at sea. Mazara del Vallo

    A silver statue of the Saint is carried in procession during u fistinu, with sailors in traditional costume. Tradition is strongly felt by mazaresi is u fistinu of Santu Vitu, (the feast of San Vito), a celebration in honor of the patron saint of the city. These celebrations have their origin in the XVII century, when, on 23 August 1614, the jurors will decide to add to the Most Holy Savior, already the patron saint of the city, the fellow San Vito as patron. This decision was then approved on 8 September of the same year by the then bishop, Monsignor Marco La Cava. The celebrations, initially held within four days prior to 15 June, were subsequently moved between the penultimate and the last week of August. Traditionally the feast opens with the proclamation, a procession in seventeenth-century dresses that winds through the streets of the city, and carries out the stops to allow the herald of proclaiming the announcement. In the days following the announcement is the Historic Procession-ideal living pictures illustrating the story of San Vito and its modest educators and Crescenzia (Sts. Opens the procession on the figure of the ancient coat of arms of the city: a woman, with in hand a cup, in the act of feeding a snake (nutrit alios et spernit suos). Follow three allegorical floats which represent the virtuesù who, according to tradition, are attributed to the holy: faith, hope and strength. These were followed by the living pictures that evoke the life of the holy: The first represents the family of Vito, with the Father lla and Vito itself, surrounded by the servants and handmaids; The second represents the imperial court Roman Diocletian and daughter Valeria healed by the holy, that parade between the senators and the Roman governor Valeriano; The third represents the communityà Christian; in Rome with the pope Marcellinus surrounded by seven deacons. The fourth represents Vito to the età of martyrdom between modest and Crescenzia (Sts, and behind them the handmaids bearing palms, sign of martyrdom, the angels and the executioner. Closes the procession the carriage with the silver statue of the Saint, towed by mazaresi fishermen in traditional costume. The festivities will conclude with the shipment of the statue on a vessel, the Blessing of the sea and the launch of a laurel wreath in water, in memory of the sailors mazaresi died at sea.

Past Events

  • FLAC - SanLorenzo Tour2018
    From 20-04-2018
    To 21-04-2018
    Concerts

    The Sicilian band returns on tour in Europe between France, Switzerland and Italy.
    Free Admission

  • Fair of the West
    From 14-07-2018
    To 22-07-2018
    Festival

    Every evening on stage set up for the event, parades, songs and dances.
    FREE admission

  • Blue Sea Land – Mediterranean Cluster Expò, Africa and Middle East
    From 04-10-2018
    To 07-10-2018
    Festival

    The Expo Blue Sea Land represents an important laboratory of economic, social, cultural and enogastronomic diplomacy.

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